Technology and Economic Empowerment of Women in Fragile States

By Krista Seddon, YWCA Australia. At the UN Commission on the Status of Women.

Side Event: Technology and Economic Empowerment of Women in Fragile States: A Multi-Country Perspective from Africa and Asia ‘We need to focus on the future young women want, but also the future that young women deserve. We need a clear focus on economic empowerment and how technology can be leveraged to empower young women and girls,’ said Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda, World YWCA General Secretary, when opening the event.

Opening statements were made by Belinda Bennet, Board Member, World YWCA. Belinda set the scene by sharing with the audience two stories on how technology has been leveraged in Northern India. Women who live in a rain feed area are using technology to communicate in order to reclaim skills they have been traditionally known for, such as growing Millet. She shared another story about an e-commerce programme in Bangladesh which is being used to connect rural and urban women to allow them to buy and sell fruit and vegetable baskets.

Anne Sipilainen, Under- Secretary of State, Finland, linked Resolution 1325 and the Beijing Platform for Action talking about the importance of accountability of these human rights instruments. She said technology is an important tool for breaking down the barriers of gender equality. ‘ICT can be our ally, ICT needs to be included in training provided in post-conflict situations. It can provide a platform for creating accessible economic opportunities for women and girls’.

Vanessa Anyoti, is a youth programme coordinator with the YWCA of Tanzania. She started by talking about the population statistics of Tanzania. With a population of 49 million with 66% under the age of 25, 53% of those young people are unemployed. Young women face more barriers for economic participation. The YWCA of Tanzania is looking to create a custom app for young women working in farming and agriculture that provides information on the weather, credit, and farming techniques.

Yadanar, YWCA of Myanmar, spoke about a young woman who participated in the YWCA holistic development programme or microfinance program.me This young womawan was provided with access to a mobile health clinic and a scholarship to help her attend ICT training. The income generated through this training has led to more education, university and security for her family. She is now mentoring and supporting other young women.

Cherelle, YWCA of Samoa, a young women and a business owner, spoke about how young women take action for themselves. She talked about the importance of innovation. Recently she worked on a project called Ray of Hope which raised $150,000 for the development of a women’s refuge center in Samoa.

The important messages that came across in this conversation we’re that often young women are seen as vulnerable. But these young women are challenging that stereotype. These young women are already leaders, making decisions and creating change for a better future.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: