20th International AIDS Conference

By Marcie Martinez , YWCA of Belize. The 20th International AIDS Conference is currently being held in Melbourne, Australia. YWCA Australia and the World YWCA held pre-training to the conference. Below Marcie shares her experience.

Delegation

YWCA Delegation

This was the first day spent in Melbourne and it was very exciting. We revised the YWCA strategic framework reminding each other of the 3 priority areas; sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR), intergenerational leadership, and movement building.

The ladies shared different stories from their different backgrounds and the kind of work YWCA is doing in their countries. Some of the most striking interventions were for example methods of condom distribution. For discretion others hand them out with the pamphlet whilst others hand them out in target areas e.g. barbershops or salons. Salons are a place where a lot of women commonly meet. These can be used as safe spaces where women meet and discuss their issues. Women who are HIV positive or victims of sexual violation need a bio psychosocial approach in order for them to regroup and plan for their future. As such it is important to have structures in society that support these women and use a multidisciplinary approach.

We need to shift from a needs based approach to a rights based approach. This promotes the fact that young women not only need support in terms of basic needs but skills to empower them to find means of meeting those needs themselves and ability to do more.

Calling On World Leaders to do something now

By Sharon Yendevenge, World YWCA Programme Associate 

“The opportunity to see decent human beings has been robbed away.”

The Human Rights Council (HRC) has brought a wide range of thoughts to my mind. So many negotiations, voting and agreements on consensus. Again it’s all about human rights but I wonder if those countries implement what they are committed to do. No matter how good or developed a country is, one cannot say that one’s country is free from violence. The globe is all full of violence in all forms. Let me share some of my experience of the HRC, the advantages and recommendations.

Having the opportunity to attend and observe at the HRC is a great opportunity and is one of the platforms where so much is digested in a limited time. One of the interesting things was the definition of a family where so much time was spent in defining what a family is. Surely people come from different cultures, traditions, religions and it was very hard to get the family definition being agreed by consensus where it was later voted for yet the violence against women resolution is adopted by consensus. Discussions and arguments vary from places to places and so HRC is a body that all languages are spoken in the same language in terms of Human Rights issues and the laws that govern it. The whole HRC gives a fair idea of what is happening at the international level but despite all the good talks, it takes more time to be implemented and less is actually happening at the country level. The sad thing is that the world’s majority is still facing the worst at the community level.

Sharon Yendevenge

Sharon Yendevenge

People are suffering from all forms of violence and at the same time all these peace talks on high level meetings continue, one very thing that is currently disturbing is the ongoing war between the Israeli and Palestine. When will this end? Calling on the world leaders to do something now as innocent lives are destroyed every day. HRC has also brought many questions as to what my country is doing in terms of people’s rights.

Despite the frustrations, the HRC has become a very good platform for all to express themselves; and to share the realities happening that can never be pointed out in their own countries in terms of fear and repercussions for telling the truth. I appreciate the work of the NGO’s in lobbying the government on certain issues concerning the human rights of people and how to fight these issues. Yet NGO’s were not given enough time to speak during the HRC, which is extremely frustrating. Therefore, I really think that the time given to the NGO’s when speaking must be increased.

It takes a lot of time and money for people to meet yet little is done by governments in protecting its people. It’s good to participate in the international level but each country needs to focus more on the national level. It is important to strengthen the awareness and develop training programmes on specific situations. Different forms of violence need to be tackled by a human rights based approach through gender mainstreaming, which is very challenging.

2014 marks 20 years of the mandate of Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women including its cause since the establishment and we are still talking about this issue. Since we are still faced with the same issues, it is important;

-to continue involve policies including women and girls, children and youths and focus on ways for better implementation in community level.

-that laws should be redesigned to protect and include all people.

-that changing of laws must be accompanied by the level of development.

-to include men and boys in all programmes dealing with women and children so they are also responsible.

-to include UN youth delegates so they represent their countries. (Youths are not involved at many things at the national level).

-to make space for youths to easily have access to ministries within their governments.

In saying that, I would say that though people may argue that HRC is just a waste of time of people meeting and other various reasons, I must say that we must also appreciate the many things they have done, also to those who have been involved in these processes with their tireless efforts fighting for peace, justice and equality all around the world and bringing it to its current state.